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How Can You Get Asthma

Side Effects Of Relievers And Preventers

How does asthma work? – Christopher E. Gaw

Relievers are a safe and effective medicine, and have few side effects as long as they are not used too much. The main side effects include a mild shaking of the hands , headaches and muscle cramps. These usually only happen with high doses of reliever inhaler and usually only last for a few minutes.

Preventers are very safe at usual doses, although they can cause a range of side effects at high doses, especially with long-term use.

The main side effect of preventer inhalers is a fungal infection of the mouth or throat . You may also develop a hoarse voice and sore throat.

Using a spacer can help prevent these side effects, as can rinsing your mouth or cleaning your teeth after using your preventer inhaler.

Your doctor or nurse will discuss with you the need to balance control of your asthma with the risk of side effects, and how to keep side effects to a minimum.

Diagnosing Asthma In Children Younger Than 6

It can be hard to tell whether a child under age 6 has asthma or another respiratory condition, because young children often cannot perform a pulmonary function test such as spirometry. After checking a childs history and symptoms, the doctor may try asthma medicines for a few months to see how well a child responds. About 40% of children who wheeze when they get colds or respiratory infections are eventually diagnosed with asthma.

What Causes Adults To Develop Asthma

At least 30% of adult asthma cases are triggered by allergies. People who are allergic to cats may have an increased risk for developing adult onset asthma. Exposure to allergens or irritants such as cigarette smoke, chemicals, mold, dust, or other substances commonly found in the persons environment might trigger the first asthma symptoms in an adult.

Prolonged exposure to certain workplace materials may set off asthma symptoms in adults.

Hormonal fluctuations in women may play a role in adult onset asthma. Some women first develop asthma symptoms during or after a pregnancy. Women going through menopause can develop asthma symptoms for the first time.

Different illnesses, viruses, or infections can be a factor in adult onset asthma. A bad cold or a bout with the flu is often a factor in adult onset asthma.

Smoking does not cause adult onset asthma however, if you smoke or if you are exposed to cigarette smoke , it may provoke asthma symptoms.

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What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Asthma Types

  • coughing, and
  • difficulty speaking.
  • Symptoms may occur during the day or at night. If they happen at night, they may disturb your sleep.

    Wheezing is the most common symptom of an asthma attack.

  • Wheezing is a musical, whistling, or hissing sound with breathing.
  • Wheezes are most often heard during exhalation, but they can occur during breathing in .
  • Not all asthmatics wheeze, and not all people who wheeze are asthmatics.
  • Current guidelines for the care of people with asthma include classifying the severity of asthma symptoms, as follows:

  • Mild intermittent: This includes attacks no more than twice a week and nighttime attacks no more than twice a month. Attacks last no more than a few hours to days. Severity of attacks varies, but there are no symptoms between attacks.
  • Mild persistent: This includes attacks more than twice a week, but not every day, and nighttime symptoms more than twice a month. Attacks are sometimes severe enough to interrupt regular activities.
  • Moderate persistent: This includes daily attacks and nighttime symptoms more than once a week. More severe asthma attacks occur at least twice a week and may last for days. Attacks require daily use of quick-relief medication and changes in daily activities.
  • Severe persistent: This includes frequent severe attacks, continual daytime symptoms, and frequent nighttime symptoms. Symptoms require limits on daily activities.
    • The exact cause of asthma is not known.

      Do People With Asthma Face A Higher Risk Of Severe Illness If They Get Covid

      How to Get Rid of Asthma

      Theres a lot we still dont know about COVID-19 and how it affects asthma patients.

      Based on the data we have so far, asthma does not appear to increase the risk of acquiring COVID-19. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention does list chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma under groups at higher risk for severe illness if they get COVID-19.

      Its important to understand what severe illness means.

      One complication from COVID-19 is acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe lung disease that results from damage to the alveoli, the air sacs of the lungs. When COVID-19 patients require ventilators, its often for acute respiratory distress syndrome. We dont know very much about the risk factors for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome or how to treat the specific type of inflammation that drives this condition, but there is no evidence that asthma is a risk factor for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome if infected with COVID-19.

      In contrast to acute respiratory distress syndrome, asthma is a chronic condition that we know a lot about. It is by airway inflammation, mucous production and airway spasm. Respiratory viruses, including strains of coronavirus that cause the common cold, can trigger asthma symptoms, and its likely that COVID-19 could do the same. Even though asthma is also an inflammatory condition, in contrast to acute respiratory distress syndrome, we have very effective treatments for asthma.

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      Q: What Increases Your Risk For Adult

      A: Most childhood asthma disappears in adulthood. But having childhood asthma increases your risk of a relapse in your 30s or 40s. Other factors that increase the risk of adult-onset asthma include:

      • Being overweight or obese: A low level of physical activity, changes in lung physiology and higher levels of inflammation are among several factors at play.
      • Being female: Hormonal fluctuations in pregnancy and menopause can trigger asthma.
      • Allergens: Cats, cigarette smoke, chemicals, mold or dust can trigger asthma.

      Whats An Asthma Attack

      When you breathe normally, muscles around your airways are relaxed, letting air move easily. During an asthma attack, three things can happen:

      • Bronchospasm: The muscles around the airways constrict . When they tighten, it makes the airways narrow. Air cannot flow freely through constricted airways.
      • Inflammation: The airway linings become swollen. Swollen airways dont let as much air in or out of the lungs.
      • Mucus production: During the attack, your body creates more mucus. This thick mucus clogs airways.

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      Asthma Attacks And What Makes Them Worse

      Your airways narrow when they overreact to certain substances. These are known as asthma triggers. What triggers asthma symptoms varies from person to person.

      When asthma symptoms suddenly occur, it is called an asthma attack . Asthma attacks can occur rarely or frequently. They may be mild to severe.

      Although some asthma attacks occur very suddenly, many become worse gradually over a period of several days. In general, you can take care of symptoms at home by following your asthma action plan. A severe attack may need emergency treatment and in rare cases can be fatal.

      Asthma is classified as intermittent, mild persistent, moderate persistent, and severe persistent.

      How Is Asthma Diagnosed

      How Do You Get Asthma?

      Along with doing a physical exam and asking about your health, your doctor may order lung function tests. These tests include:

      • Spirometry. Doctors use this test to diagnose and keep track of asthma. It measures how quickly you can move air in and out of your lungs and how much air you move.
      • Peak expiratory flow . This shows how much air you can breathe out when you try your hardest.
      • An exercise or inhalation challenge. This test measures how your breathing is affected by exercise or after taking a medicine.
      • A chest X-ray, to see if another disease is causing your symptoms.
      • Allergy tests, if your doctor thinks your symptoms may be caused by allergies.

      You will need routine checkups with your doctor to keep track of your asthma and decide on treatment.

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      When To Call A Doctor

      911 or other emergency services right away if:

      • You are having severe trouble breathing. Signs of this include:
      • Breathing very fast. Shortness of breath can interfere with the ability to speak smoothly.
      • Appearing anxious and being unable to eat because it’s too hard to breathe.
      • Using the neck, chest, and belly muscles to breathe so that the skin between, above, and under the ribs sinks inward with each breath. Your nostrils may open wide when you breathe in.
      • Taking longer than usual to breathe out and sometimes having a high-pitched, musical sound when breathing in.
      • Sitting up, leaning forward, or sitting with your nose tilted up as if sniffing the air.
      • Having skin color that stays pale, gray, bluish, or mottled, including the tongue, lips, earlobes, and nail beds.

      or seek immediate medical care if:

      • Your symptoms do not get better after you have followed your asthma action plan.
      • You have new or worse trouble breathing.
      • Your coughing and wheezing get worse.
      • You cough up dark brown or bloody mucus .
      • You have a new or higher fever.
      • You need to use quick-relief medicine on more than 2 days a week within a month .
      • You cough more deeply or more often, especially if you notice more mucus or a change in the color of your mucus.
      • You have asthma and your peak flow has been getting worse for 2 to 3 days.

      If you have not been diagnosed with asthma but have mild asthma symptoms, call your doctor and make an appointment to be checked.

      Avoid Allergens And Illness

      Exposure to allergens can cause the body to produce more mucus than normal. Allergens can include animal dander, pollen, dust mites, fragrance, certain foods, and much more. If you have allergies, avoiding these things can help reduce excess mucus production. Additionally, getting sick with a cold can cause mucus to build-up in your throat and sinus cavities. As the common cold season is approaching, wash your hands frequently, support your immune system, get enough sleep, and keep your distance from others.2

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      You Can Control Your Asthma

      You can control your asthma! When you control your asthma, you will breathe easier, be as active as you would like, sleep well, stay out of the hospital, and be free from coughing and wheezing. Learn about controlling your asthma at CDCs asthma site.

      Asthma is one of the most common lifelong chronic diseases. One in 13 Americans lives with asthma, a disease affecting the lungs and causing repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing.

      Although asthma cannot be cured, you can control your asthma successfully to reduce and to prevent asthma attacks, also called episodes. Successful asthma management includes knowing the warning signs of an attack, avoiding things that may trigger an attack, and working with your doctor to develop your personal Asthma Action Plan. CDCs National Asthma Control Program has worked to help millions of people with asthma in the United States gain control over their disease since 1999. CCARE, Controlling Childhood Asthma and Reducing Emergencies, is the programs new objective of preventing 500,000 Emergency Department visits and hospitalizations due to asthma by August 31, 2024.

      Asthma deaths have decreased over time and varied by demographic characteristics. The rate of asthma deaths decreased from 15 per million in 2001 to 10 per million in 2018. Deaths due to asthma are rare and are thought to be largely preventable, particularly among children and young adults.

      Asthma deaths have decreased over time.

      So How Can I Save On Inhalers

      Asthma Complications: Long
      • Talk to your doctor about an inhaler that has a generic. In recent years, as patents have worn off, more and more inhalers have gone generic. Fluticasone/salmeterol , and albuterol are two of the more popular inhalers that have gone generic recently.
      • Use a manufacturer coupon or patient assistance programs. Some manufacturers offer programs that can help you afford your prescription. Call your inhalers manufacturer to see if there are any programs you qualify for.
      • If you have insurance, make sure your brand is on your formulary. The majority of plans do offer preferred coverage for some inhalers, but if for some reason your plan doesnt cover your preferred inhaler, talk to your doctor about submitting an appeal.
      • Use a GoodRx coupon. GoodRx offers discounts for all FDA approved inhalers online. A discount can save you up to 80% on your out of pocket cost. Every little bit helps!
      • Try to appeal your coverage. If you have insurance and your plan doesnt cover your medication, ask your doctor about submitting an appeal, Some plans require prior authorizations meaning you need permission from your insurance plan and a special request from your doctor before you can fill your prescription. If you have insurance, call your provider and ask how to get this process started.

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      Personal And Family History

      • Gender and age. Women and men seem to have the same risk of getting asthma until they reach their 40s. After 40, women have a higher risk for asthma.
      • A family history of allergies and asthma. People who have an allergy and asthma usually have a family history of allergies or asthma.
      • Airways that overreact. People who inherit a tendency of the airways to overreact often get asthma.
      • A history of allergy. If you have an allergy, you are more likely than others to have asthma. Most children and many adults with asthma have atopic dermatitis, allergies, or both.

      How Do Healthcare Providers Diagnose Asthma

      Your healthcare provider will review your medical history, including information about your parents and siblings. Your provider will also ask you about your symptoms. Your provider will need to know any history of allergies, eczema and other lung diseases.

      Your healthcare provider may order a chest X-ray, blood test or skin test. Your provider may order spirometry. This test measures airflow through your lungs.

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      Managing And Controlling Your Asthma

      Asthma is defined as a chronic condition, which means that you need to continuously monitor and manage your asthma throughout your lifetime. While there is currently no cure for asthma, with proper and management you can effectively control your asthma and live symptom-free.

      Asthma treatment is successful if you learn all you can about your asthma including: and ongoing asthma management to achieve control. You and you alone know how you feel and how your asthma is affecting you and you need to be responsible for acting when your asthma is not in good control.

      Many people with asthma believe that their asthma is controlled but in fact, surveys have shown that most people accept levels of asthma control that fall far short of the standards described in the Canadian Consensus Asthma Guidelines. In order to control your asthma it is very important that you actually understand what good asthma control means.

      Can Asthma Reappear In Adults After Disappearing Years Ago

      How to Get Rid of Asthma FOREVER!

      Asthma is usually diagnosed in childhood. In many patients however, the symptoms will disappear or are significantly reduced after puberty. After age 20, symptoms may begin to reappear.

      Researchers have tracked this tendency for reappearing asthma and found that people with childhood asthma tend to experience reappearing symptoms through their 30s and 40s at various levels of severity.

      Regardless of whether your asthma is active, you should continue to avoid your known triggers and keep your rescue medications or prescriptions up-to-date and handy in case you need them.

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      What Is Good Asthma Care

      Your doctor or nurse will tailor your asthma treatment to your symptoms. Sometimes you may need to be on higher levels of medication than at others.

      You should be offered:

      • care at your GP surgery provided by doctors and nurses trained in asthma management
      • full information about your condition and how to control it
      • involvement in making decisions about your treatment
      • regular checks to ensure your asthma is under control and your treatment is right for you
      • a written personal asthma action plan agreed with your doctor or nurse

      It is also important that your GP or pharmacist teaches you how to properly use your inhaler, as this is an important part of good asthma care.

      Follow Your Asthma Action Plan

      • Your asthma action plan describes which controller medicines to take every day to help delay the long-term effects of asthma. The action plan also contains the steps to treat asthma attacks. See an example of an asthma action plan .
      • Use an asthma diary to help manage your asthma. Record your peak expiratory flow or your symptoms, or both. Also list the cause of your symptoms and what medicines you took for quick relief.

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      Signs Symptoms And Complications

      How often signs and symptoms of asthma occur may depend on how severe, or intense, the asthma is and whether you are exposed to allergens. Some people have symptoms every day, while others have symptoms only a few days of the year. For some people, asthma may cause discomfort but does not interfere with daily activities. If you have more severe asthma, however, your asthma may limit what you are able to do.

      When asthma is well controlled, a person shows few symptoms. When symptoms worsen, a person can have what is called an asthma attack, or an exacerbation. Over time, uncontrolled asthma can damage the airways in the lungs.

      Preparing For Your Appointment

      Can Asthma be cured?

      You can get the most out of your time with your healthcare provider by planning carefully before you go.

      Things you can do to prepare for your appointments include bringing:

      • A list of your most recent symptoms, including notes about whether theyve changed since your last visit.
      • A record of your recent peak flow meter readings or symptom diary records.
      • Your Asthma Action Plan so that you and your healthcare provider can develop a plan. If you already have one, then bring it in case it needs to be modified.
      • Your inhaler to review your technique.
      • A list of any questions you have. For example, you might ask: What makes my asthma worse? Is it okay to keep playing a sport? What should I do if I have an asthma attack?

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